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La historia de David Reimer

David Reimer (August 22, 1965 as Bruce Reimer – May 4, 2004) was a Canadian man who was born as a healthy male, but was sexually reassigned and raised as female after his penis was accidentally destroyed during circumcision. Psychologist John Money oversaw the case and reported the reassignment as successful, and as evidence that gender identity is primarily learned. Milton Diamond later reported that Reimer never identified as female, and that he began living as male at age 14. Reimer later went public with his story to discourage similar medical practices. Due to years of severe depression and a dissolving marriage, he committed suicide.

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Mind Wars:

Drugs to improve soldiers abilities? To confuse enemies? Devices controlled by or controlling peoples minds? Will neuroscience provide the weapons of the future? Jonathan Moreno, nationally distinguished bioethicist, discusses the connections between national security and brain research and argues that there is a need to contemplate the ethical, political and social implications of these advances.

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Clay Shirky – Here Comes Everybody: the power of organising without organisations

Clay Shirky’s lucid and penetrating analysis steers you through the online social explosion asking: what happens when people are given the tools to do things together, without needing traditional organisational structures?

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A hole in the head

A Hole In The Head is an hour long documentary about trepanation – the process of boring a hole in the skull.

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N/um Tchai: Ceremonial Dance of the Bushmen

Tchai is the word used by Ju/’hoansi to describe getting together to dance and sing; n/um can be translated as medicine, or supernatural potency. In the 1950’s, when this film was shot, Ju/’hoansi gathered for “medicine dances” often, usually at night, and sometimes such dances lasted until dawn. In this film, women sit on the ground, clapping and singing and occasionally dancing a round or two, while men circle around them, singing and stamping rhythms with their feet. The strength of the songs is their n/um, or medicine, thought to be a gift from the great god. N/um is also in the fire, and even more so in the “owners of medicine,” or healers.

A film by John Marshall from the !Kung series

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Minimally Invasive Education through Social Play

Creativity and play are closely connected, and play can be a form to arrive at collaborative creativity. In this session, Dr Sugata Mitra, known from the ‘Hole in the Wall’ project, will share with us how Indian children have explored new technology and found compelling ways to use it.

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Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die

Chip Heath, co-author of , talks about what makes certain ideas “naturally sticky.” Chip Heath is a Professor of Organizational Behavior in the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University. His research examines why certain ideas – ranging from urban legends to folk medical cures, from Chicken Soup for the Soul stories to business strategy myths – survive and prosper in the social marketplace of ideas. These “naturally sticky” ideas spread without external help in the form of marketing dollars, PR assistance, or the attention of leaders.

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Racism: A history (Part 3)

Paul Tickell (BBC) – Racism: A History

Series looking at how racism impacts on people’s lives

Part 1 – The Colour of Money
Examines to what extent racism is a product of 17th century economic globalisation

Part 2 – Fatal Impacts
Looks at Scientific Racism in the 19th century, which drew on now discredited sciences

Part 3 – A Savage Legacy
When the slavery of African Americans was abolished in 1865, a new age was heralded. Twenty years later these hopes evaporated

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Racism: A history (Part 2)

Paul Tickell (BBC) – Racism: A History

Series looking at how racism impacts on people’s lives

Part 1 – The Colour of Money
Examines to what extent racism is a product of 17th century economic globalisation

Part 2 – Fatal Impacts
Looks at Scientific Racism in the 19th century, which drew on now discredited sciences

Part 3 – A Savage Legacy
When the slavery of African Americans was abolished in 1865, a new age was heralded. Twenty years later these hopes evaporated

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Racism: A history (Part 1)

Paul Tickell (BBC) – Racism: A History

Series looking at how racism impacts on people’s lives

Part 1 – The Colour of Money
Examines to what extent racism is a product of 17th century economic globalisation

Part 2 – Fatal Impacts
Looks at Scientific Racism in the 19th century, which drew on now discredited sciences

Part 3 – A Savage Legacy
When the slavery of African Americans was abolished in 1865, a new age was heralded. Twenty years later these hopes evaporated

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